Important Update’s to Oregon’s 1200-Z Stormwater Discharge Permit

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Stormwater Control Measures and the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)

Stormwater runoff from the built environment remains one of the great challenges of modern water pollution control, as this source of contamination is a principal contributor to water quality impairment of water bodies nationwide. In addition to entrainment of chemical and microbial contaminants as stormwater runs over roads, rooftops, and compacted land, stormwater discharge poses a physical hazard to aquatic habitats and stream function, owing to the increase in water velocity and volume that inevitably result on a watershed scale as many individually managed sources are combined. Given the shift of the world’s population to urban settings, and that this trend is expected to be accompanied by continued wholesale landscape alteration to accommodate population increases, the magnitude of the stormwater problem is only expected to grow. In recognition of the need for improved control measures, in 1987 the U.S. Congress mandated the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), under amendments to the Clean Water Act, to control certain stormwater discharges under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. In response to this federal legislation, a permitting program was put in place by EPA as the Phase I (1990) and Phase II (1999) stormwater regulations, which together set forth requirements for municipal separate storm sewer systems and industrial activities including construction. The result of the regulatory program has been identification of hundreds of thousands of sources needing to be permitted.

1200-Z Stormwater Discharge Permit Reissued by Oregon DEQ

In August of 2018, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) entered into a Settlement Agreement with environmental advocacy groups (Columbia Riverkeeper and Northwest Environmental Defense Center) and a group of industrial stormwater permittees (Oregon Industrial Stormwater Group) that outlined changes to the 1200-Z Stormwater Discharge Permit, which was reissued on October 22, 2018.

Below, we’ve summarized the 1200-Z Permit changes:

Regional Benchmark for Zinc

The regional benchmark for total zinc was raised back to 0.12 milligrams/liter (mg/L) (from 0.090 mg/L). The 0.12 mg/L benchmark will now apply to all of Oregon, except for the Columbia Slough Watershed where the zinc benchmark is higher (0.24 mg/L).

Frequency of Impairment Pollutant Monitoring

The frequency of impairment pollutant monitoring was increased from two to four times per year. Impairment pollutant sampling will now be conducted at the same frequency as benchmark sampling. Many facilities (e.g., those in the Portland Harbor, Lower Willamette, parts of the Columbia River) have a long list of impairment pollutants, and this change could significantly increase their sampling overhead if they do not obtain a monitoring waiver.

“Our suite of filtration elements are interchangeable and fit seamlessly into our highly engineered “full capture” Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs) for stormwater. If you’re an Oregon 1200-Z permit holder, we have a solution for any of the following: trash & debris; sediment & TSS; oil & hydrocarbons; dissolved zinc only and; dissolved heavy metals.”
— Matthew Moulton, General Manager CleanWay Environmental Partners

Tier I Reports

Tier I Reports prepared in response to an exceedance of an impairment pollutant reference concentration now have to be submitted to the DEQ or agent no later than 60 days after receiving monitoring results.

Since the reference concentrations for impairment pollutants are typically equal to surface water quality standards (while benchmarks are typically higher), many facilities struggle to meet these standards. For example, many Oregon industries struggle to consistently meet the total iron reference concentration. If you are one of those facilities, make sure that you remember to select and implement a corrective action, document it in a Tier I Report, and submit it within 60 days of the issuance of the lab report. The Tier I corrective action should still be implemented within 30 days of receiving the lab report.

Tier I Reports prepared in response to benchmark exceedances will continue to be filed on site.

Discharge Monitoring Reports

The past versions of the 1200-Z Permit required annual submittal of a Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR). The re-issued 1200-Z Permit increased the reporting frequency to quarterly with the following deadlines:

DMR Submission Deadlines

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The fourth quarter DMR (due August 15) submitted during the second year of the 1200-Z Permit (for most permittees, the second year is the 2018-2019 Permit year) will need to report the geometric mean of the samples collected between July 2018 and June 2019. The geometric mean will determine whether a Tier II corrective action (treatment) is required. Don’t forget that the 1200-Z Permit allows you to collect more than the minimum four samples, as long as they are at least 14 days apart.

As a reminder, DMRs must include the following:

Monitoring results entered into the DEQ’s DMR Form (new DMR forms have not been published by the DEQ yet) certified by the “responsible corporate officer.”

Lab reports that include method detection limit, the analytical method, and the lab’s quality assurance/quality control records pH field notes (calibration records, date/time of sample collection and measurement, and measured pH values).

Monitoring Variances

If a portion or all of the stormwater generated at your site infiltrates or is re-used on site, and you are unable to collect a minimum of four samples due to “no discharge” conditions, you will need to request a Monitoring Variance. Variance requests will have to be submitted semi-annually, along with the second and fourth quarter DMRs (due February 15 and November 15).

Per the DEQ’s Monitoring Variance Request Fact Sheet, the request for a variance must include:

• A hydrologic analysis conducted following good engineering practices

• Rainfall records from nearby published rain gauges or an on-site rain gauge

• “No discharge” records (inspection records and/or photos, flow sensor/meter data)

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All of our filtration units are equipped with easy to use sample ports for simple compliance testing

Representative Sampling

If run-on from neighboring properties or non-industrial areas of the site comingles with industrial stormwater at your facility, the comingled flow is regulated under the Permit. Samples representative of industrial activities must be collected (to the extent practicable) at/near the property line, before on-site flows combine with off-site stormwater, receiving waters or discharges permitted under separate permits (e.g., cooling water, wastewater). This may impact many facilities located in ports or industrial parks where a single storm sewer system drains multiple facilities.

New Dischargers to Impaired Waterbodies

The re-issued 1200-Z Permit also tightens the requirements for new facilities that propose to discharge to impaired water bodies (e.g., Lower Willamette River and the Portland Harbor, Columbia Slough, parts of the Columbia River).

“We named our company advisedly; CleanWay Environmental Partners is all about the partnership between the industrial site permit holder, their engineering firm or specifier and CleanWay Environmental. We offer our clients a deep reservoir of applied technology across a wide spectrum of water treatment solutions. If you have a unique water treatment of filtration challenge, we invite your inquiry.”
— Steve McInnis, President CleanWay Environmental Partners

With over 25 years of experience, CleanWay Environmental Partners is dedicated to providing clients with affordable stormwater runoff solutions. Located in Portland, OR, our skilled staff is committed to serving customers nationwide with first-rate catch basin filters, downspout filtration units, premium leachate treatments, and heavy metals extraction products. Call (800) 723-1373 to request a quote and to learn more about how we can help you comply with environmental regulations.

SUPERIOR CATCH BASIN DESIGN & VERIFIABLE PERFORMANCE

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A Stormwater Filtration Device Comparative Study, Part One

CleanWay’s devices are elegantly engineered, rugged and purpose built. Unlike competitive devices that rely heavily on a cacophony of plastics, riveting and netting, CleanWay’s devices are welded structures fabricated using CNC machining to very precise dimensions. All components integrate logically and securely with a minimum of moving parts that allow for ease of maintenance, filter replacement and testing in a way that is reliable and repeatable over the lifetime of the unit.

CleanWay offers a tremendous amount of useful information on their website, and they have a very complete library of technical drawings and specifications that are deliverable as PDF attachments after initial consultation with CleanWay sales engineers to identify application specifics. Unlike most of their competitors, CleanWay offers a complete line of stormwater Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs) for retrofit in the built environment including Drop InletsCatch Basin InsertsCurb Inlets and Downspout Filters.

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You can view their complete line of filter element options by clicking here. For clients who are concerned about heavy metals capture, they can learn more about the patented MetalZorb product here. It should be noted that CleanWay’s website is also media rich, with numerous videos and 3D imaging that take the guesswork out of the installation process, maintenance orientation, sizing and other mission critical planning, specification decision making issues.

CleanWay has clearly given great thought to design features that allow maintenance, including cleaning of trash and floatables, without interrupting filtration function. CleanWay’s ridged strainer for capture of debris down to 2 mm can be removed and cleaned using a large Shop-Vac or Vactor Truck without disturbing the filtration element or disrupting full capture filtration. As CleanWay rightly states, “…our ridged strainer is the first line of defense against plugging of the secondary, pollutant-specific filtration media by capturing gross solids and floatables.” This binary filtration system, the elegance of the engineering and the ease of maintenance it affords is a clear and functionally significant advantage of the CleanWay systems across their product line.

Another feature unique to the CleanWay line of products is their patented sampling port which allows sampling at the device, again, without interrupting full capture filtration or disturbing the filtration element in any way. The significance of this feature cannot be overemphasized as CleanWay’s product line this author has encountered that allows performance verification at the device. It’s astounding, but not surprising, that manufacturers of competitive devices make extraordinary performance claims about their MTDs without any means to verify that performance in the real world. Anyone with knowledge of, and experience in managing complex stormwater facilities understands that adding structural BMPs without the ability to test their efficacy in real time is a guessing game. As such, CleanWay’s testing port allows not just for verification of device performance, but also for the collection of diagnostic data anywhere a CleanWay device is installed.

*Author’s Note: As an independent researcher and writer on sustainability and the environment, I was commissioned to author this comparative study of Manufactured Treatment Devices (MTDs) for the treatment of stormwater in the built environment. Part One, below, focuses on the full suite of MTDs manufactured and distributed in the US and Canada by CleanWay Environmental Partners, Inc. I’ve assigned Part One of this series to CleanWay as they are the only stormwater MTD manufacturer that focuses solely on the design and manufacture stormwater MTDs. It’s all they do, and they do it better than anyone else.

With over 25 years of experience, CleanWay Environmental Partners is dedicated to providing clients with affordable stormwater runoff solutions. Located in Portland, OR, our skilled staff is committed to serving customers nationwide with first-rate catch basin filters, downspout filtration units, reliable reverse osmosis systems, premium leachate treatments, and heavy metals extraction services. Call (800) 723-1373 to request a quote and to learn more about how we can help you comply with environmental regulations.

CleanWay: Part of a Long Tradition of Environmental Stewardship in Oregon

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PART ONE: A Brief History of Oregon’s Environmental & Regulatory Advocacy

Crisis On The Willamette River

The Oregon State Sanitary Authority (OSSA) was the first agency in the United States charged with protecting the environment and it became the cornerstone for future national legislation including the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (1948), and the national Clean Water Act (1972).

In 1938, Oregon voters, by a three-to-one margin, approved an initiative to regulate water pollution and to create an enforcement agency under the jurisdiction of the Oregon State Board of Health. Political pressure that led to the initiative had begun as early as the 1920s, when the Board of Health and others had expressed concerns about water pollution and its threats to human health. Rampant pollution had caused many devastating fish kills on the Willamette River the 1920s, and Portland often closed its part of the Willamette to swimming because of sewage in the water.

Since many of the biggest polluters were along the Willamette, OSSA focused its efforts there. Raw domestic sewage from cities and waste from pulp mills, paper mills and other industrial sites produced the greatest volumes of pollutants. By the late 1940s, OSSA had induced communities along the river to install sewage treatment plants. However, the agency had less success with mill owners, who resisted pollution controls on grounds of expense. Of particular concern were sulfite process mills that discharged plumes of waste that were deadly to many aquatic plants and animals. As late as 1969, low oxygen levels related to pollution were preventing upstream migration of salmon on the Willamette. Fish migration was able to continue only after Governor Tom McCall, the OSSA chairman, ordered the temporary closure of four sulfite mills along the river.

The Creation of the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)

The Oregon legislature created the DEQ during Tom McCall’s second year as governor (1967-1975), one element of what some journalists called “the most extensive shake-up of state government” in Oregon history. For decades, the state had centralized its oversight of water and air quality and solid waste management. The Oregon State Sanitary Authority (1938) was responsible for water quality, and the Oregon Air Pollution Authority (1951) oversaw air quality; the Air Pollution Authority was made part of the OSSA in 1959. In 1967, McCall led efforts to strengthen the OSSA, and in early March 1969 his legislative allies, including Republican Senator Victor Atiyeh, proposed Senate Bill 396 to separate the Sanitary Authority from the State Board of Health and create a new agency. Overseeing the Department of Environmental Quality would be a five-member, governor-appointed citizen panel—the Environmental Quality Commission—which would establish policies and provide guidance for the agency’s day-to-day work. McCall agreed to the reorganization and signed the bill on June 16, 1969. The late 1960s in the United States was a time of increased public attention on environmental issues and the need to strengthen environmental laws, and the creation of the DEQ put Oregon at the forefront in translating public sentiment into an effective regulatory and administrative framework. In early 1969, President Richard Nixon named McCall, conservationist Laurance Rockefeller, and aviator Charles Lindbergh to his Citizens Advisory Committee on Environmental Quality to provide input on what became the National Environmental Policy Act. In October 1969, David D. Dominick of the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration called Oregon’s water pollution program among the most progressive and effective in the nation. In effect, Oregon’s environmental laws provided examples for federal legislation such as the National Environmental Policy Act (1970) and the Clean Water Act (1972) and the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency (1970).

About cleanway

With over 25 years of experience, CleanWay Environmental Partners is dedicated to providing clients with affordable stormwater runoff solutions. Located in Portland, OR, our skilled staff is committed to serving customers nationwide with first-rate catch basin filters, downspout filtration units, premium leachate treatments, and heavy metals extraction products. Call (800) 723-1373 to request a quote and to learn more about how we can help you comply with environmental regulations.

Trade Shows: Why We Go

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We attend a lot of trade shows, they’re a big investment of time, money and human resources — they’re also a vital part of our business. If you’re reading this, the same might be true for you and your company. To help, we developed an internal “Trade Show Best Management Practices” (TSBMPs) document to help us put our best foot forward at each show, in essence; to set a standard for our own performance. If you’re exhibiting at, or attending, trade shows this year, we encourage you to read this through. It might be helpful in your own preparation for your next show. Should we see you at our booth, we hope you’ll tell us how we’re doing and what we might do better or differently next time around. Whenever you visit us at a trade show, it’s our firm belief that you deserve a return on the investment of your valuable time. We welcome your feedback.

First & Foremost: Listen & Learn

Our primary goal at every tradeshow is to listen to, and learn from visitors to our booth. If we don’t learn about the challenges a prospective customer faces, we can’t possibly understand how our systems might help them solve their problems. To be sure, analyzing a stormwater facility can be a complex equation, taking into account atmospheric, fleet, rainwater and runoff disposition of pollutants, inbound/outbound (both forklift and vehicular) tracking of pollutants, and legacy material in the underground system. Add to this the challenge of accurate testing at mission critical points in the system, and one can appreciate how difficult it is to isolate a pollutant source, and treat stormwater effectively. That’s why we listen carefully, and ask questions (and follow-up questions) throughout our one-on-one interactions.

An “Earned Opportunity” To Inform & Educate

Only after listening carefully, and learning everything we can about our visitor’s challenge(s) have we “earned” the opportunity to share our perspective, and the unique features and competitive advantages of our products. People are often surprised to hear, for example, that all of our MTDs have patented testing ports; that our patented MetalZorb product is unique in the industry; and that we custom blend filtration media to solve specific filtration challenges. Every interaction is also an opportunity to anticipate future challenges a customer might face. For example, new permits increasingly call for lower bench-marking and higher water quality standards, so even if we help a permit holder achieve compliance under their current permit, we also anticipate how we can help them “up their game” in order to comply under the terms of a renewed permit.

“We send our best, most experience people to every trade show because we understand the value of the one-on-one interaction. We often learn about new and unique challenges from customers in our own “backyard” as well as challenges that might be unique to a different part of the country with ever changing and evolving regulatory and environmental conditions. When you visit us, you’ll find problem solving partners that approach each interaction with complete transparency and free sharing of knowledge and ideas. That’s a promise.”

Matthew Moulton, General Manager - CleanWay Environmental Partners, Inc.

The Trade Show Calendar

As you can see from the list below, our trade show schedule keeps us busy planning, producing, traveling or exhibiting virtually year-round. At the same time, we realize the commitment is vitally important. Trade shows give us the opportunity to learn, to network and to connect with our customers and prospects one-on-one.

If you attend any of the shows below, we look forward to seeing you. If you’ve thought about attending, and would like our perspective on the benefits of being an exhibitor or attendee, please click through to our contact page here, and we’ll be happy to relate our experiences and share our thoughts:

SWS Conference, Tinley Park, IL, November 13 – 15, 2018

NEBC Oregon, Portland, OR, December 11 - 12, 2018

NEBC Washington, Tacoma, WA, March 6, 2019

Waste Expo, Las Vegas, NV, May 6 – 9, 2019

Ohio Stormwater Conference, Sharonville, OH, May 8 – 10, 2019

NEBC Oregon, Salem, OR, June 19, 2019

StormCon, Atlanta, GA, August 18 – 22, 2019

WEFTEC, Chicago, IL, September 23 – 25, 2019

CASQA, Monterey, CA, October 7 – 9, 2019

Opportunity Assessment

As you know from your own trade show experience, each show has its own focus each year, its own audience, its own personality, and its own opportunity set. WEFTEC, for example, is one of the largest trade shows in the world for the stormwater industry, with attendees exceeding 20,000 each year. When one considers that WEFTEC membership is almost double that number, marketing to the membership base through the show’s digital offerings (email blasts, social media announcements, etc.) makes a lot of sense.

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When you reach potential customers through show channels, even if they won’t be attending the show, you are now on their “radar screen”, and you’ve created an opportunity for a future conversation. As an exhibitor, refining and adding to your booth keeps it fresh and creates unexpected opportunities. At WEFTEC18, we won the “Best Inline Booth” award for “clear messaging and benefit statement supported throughout the space”. The award was posted on the WEFTEC website and on their Twitter account, and that gave us an opportunity, post show, to engage in a social conversation. So while each show is an opportunity to engage one-on-one, in group settings and technical sessions in the physical space, it’s an opportunity to engage in the digital space as well — before, during and after the show. We take the time to look at the whole trade show mechanism, and discus internally the cost/benefit of investing in the communication channels offered by each show. In the case of digital opportunities, we look at how the show’s digital offerings (advertising, social media, email announcements, etc.) might tie into our own digital enterprise.

Our consistent attendance at the SWS Conference and our long standing relationship with Stormwater Solutions Magazine, both as an advertiser and a participant in their digital Storefront program is a good example of leveraging a long term relationship and linkage to digital opportunities associated with the Conference. We’ve found that it’s always a good idea to ask about existing customer programs, discounts and advertiser/show programs to leverage our advertising investment.

With over 25 years of experience, CleanWay Environmental Partners is dedicated to providing clients with affordable stormwater runoff solutions. Located in Portland, OR, our skilled staff is committed to serving customers nationwide with first-rate catch basin filters, downspout filtration units, and heavy metals extraction products. Call (800) 723-1373 to request a quote and to learn more about how we can help you comply with environmental regulations.

STORMWATER FILTRATION MAINTENANCE

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Stormwater Maintenance Big Picture

Maintenance of stormwater Manufactured Treatments Devices (MTDs) is fundamental to the success of your Best Management Practices (BMP) plan. The good news is that effective stormwater filtration device maintenance is not difficult to do, and not difficult to teach. It is, however, critically important that if the work is done “in-house” by an employee, that the employee is not only properly trained, but understands what is at stake for the company in terms of compliance, perception of neighbors, workplace pride, safety and other considerations. This excerpt from the EPA’s NPDES website sums up the scope of an otherwise straightforward, but mission critical activity:

"All stormwater management systems, whether gray or green, require maintenance. Appropriate operation and maintenance activities ensure that stormwater practices will continue to function properly and yield expected water quality and environmental benefits, protect public safety, meet legal standards, and protect communities' financial investment."

If you choose to work with a stormwater filtration MTD maintenance contractor, Be sure that your contractor is ATT (Alternative Treatment Technologies) and O&M (Operations and Maintenance) certified. Ideally, your contractor will have experience maintaining the devices currently installed at your facility, and have a long lasting and close working relationship with the manufacturer of those devices. In the Northwest, CleanWay has worked with River City Environmental, Inc. for many years. To view the full scope of River City’s stormwater services, you can click through to that section of their website here. If you are outside of the northwest, River City is a good example of the kind of company you want to work with. It’s important to note that your stormwater filtration MTDs are named in your Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP), so your maintenance logs should name the manufacturer, and the type of MTD (catch basin, curb inlet, downspout, etc.) used at each facility location. Maintenance should include keeping a log of the amount of sediment collected and the date of removal.

“We work with industrial stormwater permit holders, in addition to engineering and environmental consulting firms, in all 50 states. If you have a question about stormwater filtration maintenance, we welcome the opportunity to speak to you, even if you’re not currently a CleanWay customer. Our highly credentialed staff has almost a century of stormwater management and filtration experience and we’re here to help.”

Matthew Moulton, General Manager - CleanWay Environmental Partners

In-House Employee Orientation & Training

Assigning a trusted employee to perform stormwater filtration device (MTD) maintenance is a great opportunity for that employee to learn about an important, but often invisible aspect of facility operation, contribute to the company and position themselves for greater responsibility through exemplary performance. At CleanWay, we’ve gone to great lengths to make maintenance of our stormwater filtration systems simple and easy for one person. Proper maintenance ensures compliance, makes the facility look better, smell better and engenders a sense of pride in ownership and workmanship. It also makes for a good neighbor, which is an important consideration. Employee awareness of the “big picture” should impress upon them the importance of the task they’re assigned. Naturally, it’s up to management to decide how much information to share, but it may be useful to share with your dedicated maintenance employee or team the purpose and requirements of the applicable NPDES parameters, an overview of your SWPPP and your BMP so they understand how their assignments fit into overall compliance. When it comes to training, CleanWay provides materials lists for each of our filtration devices, and we have a series of videos on our stormwater filtration device maintenance. To view the videos on our website, please click here.

What is the recommended frequency for maintenance?

We recommend monthly inspections, which are required for most permit holders. Visual inspections provide the clues so you know when it’s time for maintenance:

• The strainer insert is dirty and debris has accumulated in the strainer

• The water level in the strainer rises above normal levels—which is seen during rain events

• Water sampling shows water quality decay or degradation

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How is stormwater maintenance done?

Cleaning your CleanWay catch basin can be done with a Vactor® truck or manually, completed by one person.

• First, remove the grate to access the catch basin

• Second, remove the strainer using the handle. Empty and clean the strainer in an approved receptacle. 

To perform maintenance on the filter element, a Vactor truck, vacuum truck street sweeper or large shop vac can all be used to remove accumulated pollutants and debris. Once the pollutants are removed, dispose the used filter element and install a new replacement element. Re-install the cleaned ridged strainer and place the grate back over the complete filter assembly taking care not to damage the gasket or dislodge the sample port plug. Check with your local disposal company for the best disposal options of accumulated pollutants.

How often does the Filtration Fabric element need to be replaced?

We recommend installing a new Filtration Fabric element at the start of your rainy season. For example, a new element in the northwest is installed in early October. Once the leaves have fallen around the end of November, we replace the element again. This second element may last through the remainder of the rainy season. The life of the filter element depends on the condition of the pavement, volume and type of traffic, the area of pavement that the filter serves and the weather conditions. To perform at its best, the filter element should be replaced regularly if exposed to oily grit. Filtration Fabric elements are very inexpensive and easy to replace. Simple visual inspection of the filters on a monthly basis is all that is usually required to determine if the element needs to be replaced. We encourage replacing the element at the first indication it’s becoming clogged. To view our high-efficiency filtration element options, please click here.

With over 25 years of experience, CleanWay Environmental Partners is dedicated to providing clients with affordable stormwater runoff solutions. Located in Portland, OR, our skilled staff is committed to serving customers nationwide with first-rate catch basin filters, downspout filtration units, premium leachate treatments, and heavy metals extraction products. Call (800) 723-1373 to request a quote and to learn more about how we can help you comply with environmental regulations.

LET’S TALK, CLEANWAY IS HERE TO HELP

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How CleanWay Helps Industrial Stormwater Permit Holders With Compliance Issues In A No-Obligation Advisory Role

We help hundreds of clients and scores of engineering and environmental consulting firms each year to meet industrial stormwater permit requirements. In doing so, we often take a no-obligation advisory role with prospective customers who are facing complex challenges around atmospheric, fleet, rainwater and runoff disposition of pollutants, and of inbound/outbound facility (both forklift and vehicular) tracking of pollutants — even if they don’t currently use our products.

 

We Can Help Meet The Challenge of Re-Permitting & Higher Water Quality Standards

New permits increasingly call for lower benchmarking and higher water quality standards, so even if a permit holder may be in compliance under their current permit, they will have to “up their game” in order to comply under the terms of a renewed permit. We’ve consulted on many projects where the permit holder has been in compliance for the capture of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and lead (Pb), but need to reduce aluminum (Al), as is the case in many jurisdictions, in order to qualify for a new permit.

“In 1980, I owned and operated an industrial scale recycling operation. I was increasingly concerned about stormwater runoff into the stream adjacent to our property. I spoke to my peers, other engineers and regulatory contacts and their advice and shared knowledge led to the beginnings of CleanWay Environmental Partners and the stormwater solutions we offer today. Our willingness to share our expertise is grounded in that early experience of open dialogue to achieve the common goal of environmental stewardship and regulatory compliance. It’s a philosophy we put into practice every day.”

Steve McInnis, Founder & President - CleanWay Environmental Partners

 

25 Years of Innovation, Knowledge & Responsiveness Is A Phone Call Away

When you call, you’ll speak to experts in the stormwater management field. You’ll find complete transparency and free sharing of knowledge and ideas from the CleanWay “brain trust” that includes CleanWay’s founder (a holder of 20 patents for stormwater treatment and water purification technologies), in addition to our sales engineers who are experts in stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs), water chemistry and environmental engineering. Collectively, our highly credentialed staff has almost a century of stormwater management and filtration experience.

CleanWay works with scores of engineering and environmental consulting firms nationally. That includes firms that assist customers to meet NPDES permitting requirements. We enjoy talking to engineers (we have them on staff) and they’re quick to integrate our products into their plans to meet client challenges.”

 Matthew Moulton, General Manager - CleanWay Environmental Partners

These Are Some of The Questions We’re Commonly Asked:

• What are the costs and turn-around of your products? Our products are competitively priced. Our catch basins are custom fabricated to each customer’s unique specifications. All products are manufactured in our Portland, OR facility using CNC technology and the highest quality materials. Turn-around time is typically 10 days. You can find the forms to fill out for catch basin fabrication using this link to our website.

What is the frequency of maintenance? Monthly inspections, which are required for most permit holders, provide visual clues when it’s time for maintenance: a) when the rigid strainer insert is dirty and debris has accumulated in the strainer, b) when the water level in the strainer rises above normal levels—which is seen during rain events, c) when water samples taken from the unit show water quality decay or degradation. We recommend replacement of Adsorb-it filtration elements at the beginning of each rainy season. Naturally, maintenance will be predicated upon adherence to other Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPP) protocols. For answers to other frequently asked questions, click here

• Can you work with our engineering and/or environmental consulting firm? Yes, we work with scores of engineering and environmental consulting firms nationally. That includes firms that assist customers to meet NPDES permitting requirements. We enjoy talking to engineers (we have them on staff) and they’re quick to integrate our products into their plans to meet client challenges. In fact, we’ve been asked to participate in studies by consulting and industrial research entities that highlighted the superior performance of our products. To view one such study conducted by Environmental Compliance Services, Inc. (ECS), in association with the National Shipbuilding Research Program (NSRP), click here.

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These Are Some of The Questions We Commonly Ask Prospective Customers:

What pollutants are you trying to remove, and do you have a record of stormwater analysis that you can share with us? It’s quite common for customers and prospective customers to share permit and analysis specifics with us, and we take the time to review that data in order to provide the best, most expedient solution to their specific challenge. We have experience helping customers in all 50 states, and it’s very rare that we encounter a challenge we haven’t addressed in the past.

What type of fleet traffic do you have? Fleet traffic represents significant potential disposition of pollutants. Vehicles capture and transport atmospheric pollutants that can be deposited on your hardscape. Additionally, the grinding of tires deposits zinc, and the application of brakes deposits copper. Forklift track-out can also be a pollutant contributor.

What is the surrounding environment? Any facility near a major roadway or railroad right of way is subject to atmospheric disposition of pollutants. Likewise, adjacent facilities (even if they’re not required to hold a permit, like a storage facility), can be a source of sheet runoff from metal buildings. The unfortunate reality for many of our customers is this: When it hits the ground, you own it. Fortunately, CleanWay has vast experience and a whole suite of products that can be deployed to meet virtually any stormwater management challenge.

 

With over 25 years of experience, CleanWay Environmental Partners is dedicated to providing clients with affordable stormwater runoff solutions. Located in Portland, OR, our skilled staff is committed to serving customers nationwide with first-rate catch basin filters, downspout filtration units, premium leachate treatments, and heavy metals extraction services. Call (800) 723-1373 to request a quote and to learn more about how we can help you comply with environmental regulations.

Stormwater Industry Leading Downspout Filtration from CleanWay

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If There’s a Mysterious Gap in Your Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs): LOOK UP!

When we think of stormwater runoff, we most often look down. That’s where the water is, coursing over paved hardscapes and into inlets, basins and non-specific channeled conveyances. Stormwater is a surface contamination issue, first underfoot and then underground. Right?

Rooftops: A Significant, and Often Overlooked, Source of Stormwater Pollutants and Heavy Metals Runoff

Rooftops often represent a large percentage of an industrial site’s hardscape footprint, as much as 25% or more. They’re also collectors and incubators of a wide range of pollutants and dissolved heavy metals that can impact post-construction stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) industrial and non-industrial permit requirements. It’s not just the dissolved zinc from galvanized rooftop HVAC equipment, moss inhibitors and abrasion resistance coatings that pose a challenge. It’s also environmental deposition of dissolved copper and lead from neighboring properties or nearby roadways where copper is found in brake linings and lead is found in tire weights. When you consider the collection of organic matter, including dead birds, squirrels and insects, a rooftop is often an incubator for viruses and pathogenic bacteria that attach themselves to suspended solids resulting in toxic turbidity.

“Our downspout filtration system is just one of the creative ways we help our industrial and commercial partners meet the challenges of stormwater filtration. In fact, it’s part of a whole suite of stromwater filtration products that we’ve created, patented and are able to adapte for each customers specific needs.”

Matthew Moulton, General Manager, CleanWay Environmental Partners

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High Capacity, Dry/Wet Configuration and Verifiable Performance

CleanWay recognized the need for rooftop stormwater and downspout filtration over 20 years ago. As a result, we’ve continuously refined our downspout filtration system (also referred to as roof drain filters, gutter drain filters or rainwater filters) to meet the evolving needs of our customers. Unlike inline options, which require cutting and fitting of the existing downspout, our units are free standing, easily accessible for maintenance and cleaning and incorporate a patented water sampling port for verifiable filtration performance. Two levels of outlet openings allow the unit to be run in either a dry (where vector control is a concern) or wet configuration (to increase removal rates with additional contact time).

“All Surface Filtration”, Maximum Volume and Dual Filtration Sets CleanWay Apart

When you’re investigating a downspout filtration system, consider that our filtration vessel is six (6) to eight (8) times larger in volume than inline systems. Then take into account that our rigid strainer is completely covered by a site-specific absorption media envelop to maximize contact with stormwater runoff — virtually eliminating unfiltered water in high volume bypass scenarios: Here’s how it works: Our absorption media section incorporates a flexible open mesh fabric envelope with a specialized media blend suspended from the support assembly and fitted into the basin so all influent passes through both strainer and filtration media before exiting to the downstream conduit. The combination of gross solids removal via the strainer and the absorption / filtration in the media section virtually eliminates heavy metals, suspended solids, turbidity and other pollutants. Our site-specific filtration elements include:

  1. Rigid Strainer: Trash & Debris (sized to capture particles down to 3.2 mm)
  2. Geotextile Element: Sediment & TSS
  3. Adsorb-It Element: Oil & Hydrocarbons
  4. Vermiculite Media: Dissolved Zinc Only
  5. MetalZorb Media: Dissolved Heavy Metals

“We named our company advisedly; CleanWay Environmental Partners is all about the partnership between the industrial site permit holder, their engineering firm or specifier and CleanWay Environmental. We offer our clients a deep reservoir of applied technology across a wide spectrum of water treatment solutions. If you have a unique water treatment of filtration challenge, we invite your inquiry.”

Steve McInnis, President, CleanWay Environmental Partners

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Ease of Installation, Configuration, Maintenance & Testing

Our attractive, non-obtrusive downspout filtration systems are easy to install, simply place it next to your downspout and “plug it in.” Available in standard or custom configurations, our downspout filters fit the side of any building, and can be connected on the right or left side, depending on your site configuration. Because rooftop runoff can contain many different pollutants of concern, we help you to determine the best media blend for your application. For ease of cleaning and filter replacement, the top lid can be locked in an open position so a single operator can service the unit by hand or by Vactor truck. Applications include:

  1. Industrial roofs (including permitted Industrial Users (IU), Significant Industrial Users (SIU), Categorical Industrial Users (CIU)
  2. Commercial roofs
  3. High rise buildings
  4. Parking structures
  5. Mixed use buildings

With over 25 years of experience, CleanWay Environmental Partners is dedicated to providing clients with affordable stormwater runoff solutions. Located in Portland, OR, our skilled staff is committed to serving customers nationwide with first-rate catch basin filters, downspout filtration units, premium leachate treatments, and heavy metals extraction products. Call (800) 723-1373 to request a quote and to learn more about how we can help you comply with environmental regulations.

Pilot Program Yields California Certification for CleanWay’s Curb Inlet and Drop Inlet Filtration Systems

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When the City of Riverside, CA searched for solutions to meet California’s Trash Amendments* for stormwater, they approached CleanWay Environmental Partners to conduct a pilot program for Full Capture Trash Treatment Control Devices. We were singled out based on our long experience and strong reputation nationally for solving stormwater filtration, metals removal and wastewater treatment challenges.

Innovative, Modular Curb Inlet & Drop Inlet Filtration Systems

Our partnership with the City of Riverside specifically addressed the development of innovative, modular Curb Inlet and Drop Inlet Filtration Systems. To meet the rigid California standards, our systems are scalable to meet peak flowrates regardless of inlet size; trap all particles down to the 5mm level; does not bypass trash and eliminates upstream diversion. Unlike other systems, the CleanWay solution maximizes catch basin drainage, depriving mosquitoes of breeding habitat, a critical criteria for certification.

“We strive always to design and manufacture products that are useful, practical and deliver long-lasting utility. It’s been our great privilege to work with the Riverside team, and to join the exclusive list of manufactures with products that meet the rigid California Trash Amendments standards.”
Bridget Garlinghouse, EIT, CleanWay Environmental Partners

Maximum Capacity, Modular & Scalable by Design

The CleanWay systems address several key design considerations: The filtration units perform in heavy commercial and residential use urban environments with high trash volumes and under historically high storm flow rates; they fit curb inlets ranging from 10’ to 30’ in length; and the filtration basins are scalable to manage varying volumes at each existing inlet structure.

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Unique Challenges Met & Expectations Exceeded

Significantly, the CleanWay system is comprised entirely of perforated stainless steel that folds flat to fit into the narrow inlet opening — then unfolds inside the existing basin structure to occupy virtually the entire existing catch basin volume. The structural rigidity of our system maintains trash catch basin volume under maximum trash/water loading, unlike flexible mesh systems and other inferior alternatives. An integrated, under curb rail system allows the stainless catch baskets to slide out of the way for access to the existing inlet and basin structure and associated piping for ease of maintenance and repair. Our fold flat design also reduces shipping costs, and resolves storage and delivery-to-site issues.

"This was a perfect opportunity for us to apply the knowledge, problem solving ability and fabrication expertise we've applied to similar non-point pollution and stormwater trash abatement challenges in the Pacific Northwest and beyond for over 20 years. Every project is a chance to innovate and refine our products in collaboration with our municipal, state, industrial and commercial partners, and the Riverside project was an exemplary case in point."
Matthew Moulton, General Manager, CleanWay Environmental Partners

CleanWay’s Curb Inlet and Drop Inlet Filtration Systems are manufactured at our Portland, OR facility, ship nationally and can be installed by certified installers in virtually all jurisdictions.

With over 25 years of experience, CleanWay Environmental Partners is dedicated to providing clients with affordable stormwater runoff solutions. Located in Portland, OR, our skilled staff is committed to serving customers nationwide with first-rate catch basin filters, downspout filtration units, premium leachate treatments, and heavy metals extraction services. Call (800) 723-1373 to request a quote and to learn more about how we can help you comply with environmental regulations.

*In 2015, the State Water Board adopted an Amendment to the Water Quality Control Plan for Ocean Waters of California (Ocean Plan) to Control Trash and Part 1 Trash Provision of the Water Quality Control Plan for Inland Surface Waters, Enclosed Bays, and Estuaries (ISWEBE Plan). Together, they are collectively referred to as 'the Trash Amendments'. The project objective for the Trash Amendments is to provide statewide consistency for the Water Boards' regulatory approach to protect aquatic life and public health, and to reduce environmental issues associated with trash in state waters.

How Do Catch Basin Filters and Inserts Work?

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As part of a storm drain system, catch basins—as well as catch basin insertsand filters—prevent the accumulation of standing water and flooding. These features prevent water from pooling on roadways, fields, parking lots, or other surfaces. They also can be used to remove contaminants from stormwater runoff, keeping water sources clean. Below are some things you should know about these systems. 

How Does a Catch Basin Work?

When constructing drainage systems, catch basins must be installed properly to function well. The grate should be even with the surface of the ground and connect to a belowground compartment. Stormwater will run into the compartment below and through the outlet pipe that drains the water.

The number of storm drains, required for efficient drainage depends on how much water can be expected during peak periods. For instance, in areas where snowmelt creates a high amount of water, more basins will be necessary. The slope of the ground and the average amount of rainfall will also affect this number.

What Are Catch Basin Inserts & Filters?

Catch basin inserts are used to capture and retain stormwater pollutants. The inserts use a strainer and catch basin filters to remove debris, including heavy metals, sediments, and trash. This pre-treatment removes contaminants from storm water runoff, meeting environmental standards. They can be inserted retroactively or during initial construction of the system, offering a solution to problems that may otherwise pollute water sources and make your company fail water quality standards. 

If your business or municipality requires these stormwater treatment systems, reach out to CleanWay Environmental Partners in Portland, Oregon. For more than 20 years, we’ve been helping businesses across the nation comply with water quality regulations. Our team of professionals will even show you how to maintain and care for your catch basin inserts and filters. Give us a call today at (800) 723-1373 for more information, or visit us online to learn more. 

5 Ways Heavy Metals and Chemicals can Contaminate Stormwater Runoff

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As rainwater travels down roofs and roads, stormwater runoff mixes with pollutants found on artificial surfaces before flowing into basins, rivers, and lakes. Capable of contaminating drinking water, killing marine life, and destroying natural habitats, stormwater runoff needs to be dealt with properly. With pollution problems on the rise, now is the optimal time for property owners and corporations to prevent pollution through responsible stormwater management. Learn about common sources of contamination below. 

5 Things That Can Pollute Stormwater Runoff

1. Auto Emissions

Car emissions are one of the most common causes of stormwater runoff contamination. For instance, when a leaking car discharges oil onto the street, this fluid can seep into soil or get washed down storm drains. As a result, auto emissions can introduce petrol, diesel, nitrogen, and other toxins into water sources.

2. Rooftop Runoff

When it rains, precipitation flows off of roofs and onto the ground. As water drips down these surfaces, it mingles with aluminum, alloys, and other rooftop sediments. Hazards occur when this tainted stormwater runoff affects the soil and surrounding vegetation.  

3. Septic Systems

When septic systems are not routinely pumped, sewage can build up inside of their pipes. Over time, the pressure caused by this congestion can force waste out of the plumbing and into the streets. This sewage carries bacteria that can seep into nearby bodies of water.

4. Pesticides

Stormwater runoff can also carry herbicides, fertilizers, and pesticides. Although these chemicals are safe for field applications, if they are introduced into new environments by rainwater, they can cause issues for vegetation and animal life. 

5. Waste Disposal

The improper disposal of waste can contaminate stormwater. Rather than recycling, some construction company trucks will discard wood, metals, and other materials down storm drains. Consequently, stormwater runoff can carry trash and debris directly into the ocean.

With over 25 years of experience, CleanWay Environmental Partners is dedicated to providing clients with affordable stormwater runoff solutions. Located in Portland, OR, our skilled staff is committed to serving customers nationwide with first-rate catch basin filters, downspout filtration units, premium leachate treatments, and heavy metals extraction services. Call (800) 723-1373 to request a quote and to learn more about how we can help you comply with environmental regulations.